Category Archives: e-dict

e-dict: shakesknees

Shakesknees (n.)
-someone who has stage fright. Portmanteau of Shakespeare and knees.

E.g.:
“The guy could talk Shakespeare all day, couplets and sonnets at the ready. But put him on the stage, and suddenly he was shakesknees.”


e-dict: quote mode

Quote mode (n.)
-the phenomenon of entering into a conversation that is solely comprised of quotations from popular culture media, usually causing annoyance in anyone within earshot.

E.g.:

“The coffee must have kicked in, because Lukas was now set to quote mode.”


e-dict: buttfriend

Buttfriend (n.)
-a straight man’s term for a male homosexual’s romantic partner, implying assumed anal intercourse.

E.g.:

“So what’s your new buttfriend’s name? Buttfriend–it’s what you guys call it, right?”


e-dict: jerseys

Jerseys (pl. n.)
-collegiate athletes who appear to have had their civilian wardrobes replaced entirely with athletic apparel, generally warm-up clothes.

E.g.:
“Huntar hadn’t figured Sebastien to be a moped type; in Huntar’s mind they were reserved for lazy jerseys and the girls that chased them.”


e-dict: east-witching

East-witch (intr. v.)

-to have only one’s splayed feet and ankles visible with the rest of the body hidden, usually lying down.  Neologism from the Wicked Witch of the East.

E.g.:
“Up ahead he noticed a pair of feet east-witching out from under a bush.”


e-dict: emp

If you’ve been reading the book so far, you no doubt have come across Ean’s distinctive use of language.  Word play, portmanteaus, neologisms, alliteration, etc. are basically protein shakes for Ean’s writing muscles.  While most of this language can be understood in context and with a superficial knowledge of pop culture, we thought it would be fun to create a lexicon of Ean’s slang.

Emp (n., v.)

-neologism from the acronym EMP (electro-magnetic pulse)

E.g.:

“And with that thought Huntar emped harder than he had ever emped before. Red light erupted in the space between his hands and The Chalet, shooting him backwards through the air.”

Variations:

to emp

an emp

an empist or an emper


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